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Mark Twain Casino
Location La Grange, Missouri
Address 104 Pierce St
Opening dateJuly 25, 2001
Total gaming space18,000 sq ft (1,700 m2)
Notable restaurantsWinner's Grill, Huckleberry's Steakhouse
Casino typeRiverboat
OwnerAffinity Gaming
Previous namesTerrible's Mark Twain Casino (2005-2011)
WebsiteMarkTwainCasinoLaGrange.com


Mark Twain Casino and RV Park is a casino located in La Grange, Missouri owned by Affinity Gaming. LaGrange is in Northeast Missouri and sits on the Mississippi River. The property has an 18,000 sq ft (1,700 m2) casino. The casino floor has over 420 slot machines and video poker, as well as 6 table games.[1]

History[edit]

The Mark Twain Casino opened July 21, 2005 and was first operated by Grace Entertainment.[2] Mark Twain Casino and RV Park was one of three Midwest casinos acquired from Grace Entertainment in 2005 for $287 million.[3] The other casinos were St. Jo Frontier Casino in St. Joseph, Missouri and Lakeside Hotel and Casino in Osceola, Iowa. When Herbst Gaming took over, the casino's name was changed to Terrible's Mark Twain Casino. In May 2011, Herbst Gaming changed its name to Affinity Gaming, and the casino's name reverted back to its original name, dropping 'Terrible's'. Michael Silberling was named CEO of Affinity Gaming in August 2014. [4]

Attractions[edit]

The venue's RV park has 8 RV hook up spaces with level concrete pads, room for slide-outs, water and electrical hook-ups.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^'Midwest Properties'. Affinity Gaming.
  2. ^https://www.whig.com/story/15136076/ten-years-later-mark-twain-casino-still-producing-jobs-revenue-for-lagrange
  3. ^'Herbst Gaming, Inc. and Grace Entertainment Jointly Accounce Definitive Agreements Regarding Asset Purchase'.
  4. ^Stutz, Howard. 'Affinity Gaming announces new CEO'. Las Vegas Review-Journal.
  5. ^'Midwest Properties'. Affinity Gaming.

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External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°02′10″N91°29′59″W / 40.03600°N 91.49962°W

Retrieved from 'https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Mark_Twain_Casino&oldid=989456770'
Mark Twain
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Thomas V. Quirk
Professor Emeritus of English, University of Missouri, Columbia. Author of Nothing Abstract: Investigations in the American Literary Imagination and editor of The Portable Mark Twain.
Alternative Titles: Samuel L. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne Clemens

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel Langhorne Clemens, (born November 30, 1835, Florida, Missouri, U.S.—died April 21, 1910, Redding, Connecticut), American humorist, journalist, lecturer, and novelist who acquired international fame for his travel narratives, especially The Innocents Abroad (1869), Roughing It (1872), and Life on the Mississippi (1883), and for his adventure stories of boyhood, especially The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885). A gifted raconteur, distinctive humorist, and irascible moralist, he transcended the apparent limitations of his origins to become a popular public figure and one of America’s best and most beloved writers.

Who was Mark Twain?

Mark Twain was an American humorist, novelist, and travel writer. Today he is best remembered as the author of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885). Real cash slot apps iphone. Twain is widely considered one of the greatest American writers of all time.

What is Mark Twain’s real name?

Mark Twain is the pen name of Samuel Clemens. Although the exact origins of the name are unknown, it is worth noting that Clemens operated riverboats, and mark twain is a nautical term for water found to be two fathoms (12 feet [3.7 metres]) deep: mark (measure) twain (two).

Where did Mark Twain grow up?

Mark Twain was born on November 30, 1835, in Florida, Missouri. In 1839 his family moved to the Mississippi port town of Hannibal in search of greater economic opportunities. In Old Times on the Mississippi (1875), he recalled his childhood in Hannibal with fondness.

When did Mark Twain start writing?

In 1848 Mark Twain became a printer’s apprentice for the Missouri Courier. Three years later his elder brother, Orion, bought the Hannibal Journal, and Twain began working for him as a typesetter. Occasionally, he contributed sketches and articles to the Journal. Some of his early sketches, such as “The Dandy Frightening the Squatter” (1852), circulated in local newspapers.

What are some of Mark Twain’s most famous works?

During his lifetime Mark Twain wrote more than 20 novels. His most famous novels included The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884), which are loosely based on Twain’s boyhood experiences in Missouri. Twain also wrote numerous short stories, most notably “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” (1865).

When did Mark Twain die?

What happens when roulette lands on green. Mark Twain died on April 21, 1910. The last piece of writing he did, evidently, was the short humorous sketch “Etiquette for the Afterlife: Advice to Paine.” The sketch was published posthumously in 1995.

Youth

Samuel Clemens, the sixth child of John Marshall and Jane Lampton Clemens, was born two months prematurely and was in relatively poor health for the first 10 years of his life. His mother tried various allopathic and hydropathic remedies on him during those early years, and his recollections of those instances (along with other memories of his growing up) would eventually find their way into Tom Sawyer and other writings. Because he was sickly, Clemens was often coddled, particularly by his mother, and he developed early the tendency to test her indulgence through mischief, offering only his good nature as bond for the domestic crimes he was apt to commit. When Jane Clemens was in her 80s, Clemens asked her about his poor health in those early years: “I suppose that during that whole time you were uneasy about me?” “Yes, the whole time,” she answered. “Afraid I wouldn’t live?” “No,” she said, “afraid you would.”

Insofar as Clemens could be said to have inherited his sense of humour, it would have come from his mother, not his father. John Clemens, by all reports, was a serious man who seldom demonstrated affection. No doubt his temperament was affected by his worries over his financial situation, made all the more distressing by a series of business failures. It was the diminishing fortunes of the Clemens family that led them in 1839 to move 30 miles (50 km) east from Florida, Missouri, to the Mississippi River port town of Hannibal, where there were greater opportunities. John Clemens opened a store and eventually became a justice of the peace, which entitled him to be called “Judge” but not to a great deal more. In the meantime, the debts accumulated. Still, John Clemens believed the Tennessee land he had purchased in the late 1820s (some 70,000 acres [28,000 hectares]) might one day make them wealthy, and this prospect cultivated in the children a dreamy hope. Late in his life, Twain reflected on this promise that became a curse:

It put our energies to sleep and made visionaries of us—dreamers and indolent.…It is good to begin life poor; it is good to begin life rich—these are wholesome; but to begin it prospectively rich! The man who has not experienced it cannot imagine the curse of it.

Judging from his own speculative ventures in silver mining, business, and publishing, it was a curse that Sam Clemens never quite outgrew.

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Perhaps it was the romantic visionary in him that caused Clemens to recall his youth in Hannibal with such fondness. As he remembered it in “Old Times on the Mississippi” (1875), the village was a “white town drowsing in the sunshine of a summer’s morning,” until the arrival of a riverboat suddenly made it a hive of activity. The gamblers, stevedores, and pilots, the boisterous raftsmen and elegant travelers, all bound for somewhere surely glamorous and exciting, would have impressed a young boy and stimulated his already active imagination. And the lives he might imagine for these living people could easily be embroidered by the romantic exploits he read in the works of James Fenimore Cooper, Sir Walter Scott, and others. Those same adventures could be reenacted with his companions as well, and Clemens and his friends did play at being pirates, Robin Hood, and other fabled adventurers. Among those companions was Tom Blankenship, an affable but impoverished boy whom Twain later identified as the model for the character Huckleberry Finn. There were local diversions as well—fishing, picnicking, and swimming. A boy might swim or canoe to and explore Glasscock’s Island, in the middle of the Mississippi River, or he might visit the labyrinthine McDowell’s Cave, about 2 miles (3 km) south of town. The first site evidently became Jackson’s Island in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; the second became McDougal’s Cave in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. In the summers, Clemens visited his uncle John Quarles’s farm, near Florida, Missouri, where he played with his cousins and listened to stories told by the slave Uncle Daniel, who served, in part, as a model for Jim in Huckleberry Finn.

It is not surprising that the pleasant events of youth, filtered through the softening lens of memory, might outweigh disturbing realities. However, in many ways the childhood of Samuel Clemens was a rough one. Death from disease during this time was common. His sister Margaret died of a fever when Clemens was not yet four years old; three years later his brother Benjamin died. When he was eight, a measles epidemic (potentially lethal in those days) was so frightening to him that he deliberately exposed himself to infection by climbing into bed with his friend Will Bowen in order to relieve the anxiety. A cholera epidemic a few years later killed at least 24 people, a substantial number for a small town. In 1847 Clemens’s father died of pneumonia. John Clemens’s death contributed further to the family’s financial instability. Even before that year, however, continuing debts had forced them to auction off property, to sell their only slave, Jennie, to take in boarders, even to sell their furniture.

Apart from family worries, the social environment was hardly idyllic. Missouri was a slave state, and, though the young Clemens had been reassured that chattelslavery was an institution approved by God, he nevertheless carried with him memories of cruelty and sadness that he would reflect upon in his maturity. Then there was the violence of Hannibal itself. One evening in 1844 Clemens discovered a corpse in his father’s office; it was the body of a California emigrant who had been stabbed in a quarrel and was placed there for the inquest. In January 1845 Clemens watched a man die in the street after he had been shot by a local merchant; this incident provided the basis for the Boggs shooting in Huckleberry Finn. Two years later he witnessed the drowning of one of his friends, and only a few days later, when he and some friends were fishing on Sny Island, on the Illinois side of the Mississippi, they discovered the drowned and mutilated body of a fugitive slave. As it turned out, Tom Blankenship’s older brother Bence had been secretly taking food to the runaway slave for some weeks before the slave was apparently discovered and killed. Bence’s act of courage and kindness served in some measure as a model for Huck’s decision to help the fugitive Jim in Huckleberry Finn.

After the death of his father, Sam Clemens worked at several odd jobs in town, and in 1848 he became a printer’s apprentice for Joseph P. Ament’s Missouri Courier. He lived sparingly in the Ament household but was allowed to continue his schooling and, from time to time, indulge in boyish amusements. Nevertheless, by the time Clemens was 13, his boyhood had effectively come to an end.

Quick Facts
born
November 30, 1835
Florida, Missouri

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died
April 21, 1910 (aged 74)
Redding, Connecticut
Mark Twain Casino Jobs
notable works
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movement / style

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awards and honors

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  • Hall of Fame for Great Americans (1920)